Category Archives: Customer Interest

True Grip 14′ Results

TrueGripResults

Thank you to everyone that came out to compete! Without you events such as this would not be such a success.  It was a very competitive event with over 180 participants over the course of the day.  Results are listed below starting with the female divisions.

First Name Last Name Team Name Gender Category Total Points Place
Leah Bell-Johnson Team BRC Female Junior 18,000 1
Sasha Rubenfeld Team BRC Female Junior 17,600 2
Julia Casey Team BRC Female Junior 16,500 3
Caroline Walton Inner Strength Female Junior 16,300 4
Jordan Hartnett Team Sik Bird Female Junior 16,100 5
Maren Stubenvoll EarthTreks Golden Female Junior 7,100 6
First Name Last Name Team Name Gender Category Total Points Place
Maggie Boyer Team BRC Female Youth-A 18,600 1
Lisa Kilmer Team BRC Female Youth-A 17,600 2
Madeline D’Amato Team BRC Female Youth-A 17,600 3
Rachel Cohen Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-A 17,000 4
Jessica Hawkins Vail Athletic Club Female Youth-A 16,800 5
Nadine Wong Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-A 16,800 6
Hannah Gibbs Inner Strength Female Youth-A 16,800 7
Jahna Walls Team BRC Female Youth-A 16,800 8
Abby Wilson Team BRC Female Youth-A 15,500 9
Camille Olson Vail Athletic Club Female Youth-A 15,400 10
Sara Denhoffer Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-A 15,300 11
Sarah Sarno Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-A 14,900 12
Camille Garcia Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-A 14,800 13
Annabelle Pasnau Team BRC Female Youth-A 14,300 14
Emma Binder Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-A 13,800 15
Kacie Palmer Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-A 13,300 16
Mackenzie Whitehead-Bust Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-A 11,500 17
First Name Last Name Team Name Gender Category Total Points Place
Brooke Raboutou Team ABC Female Youth-B 20,400 1
Ariana O’Brien Team ABC Female Youth-B 20,200 2
Ravelle Nelson Team ABC Female Youth-B 19,500 3
Lillian Friefeld Team ABC Female Youth-B 19,000 4
Madison Larson EarthTreks Golden Female Youth-B 18,000 5
Katy McCutchan *None/Not listed Female Youth-B 17,600 6
Izabela Nowak Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-B 17,600 6
Kamawela Leka Team BRC Female Youth-B 17,600 8
Kate Soulliere Lakewood Female Youth-B 17,600 9
Ari Alpert Team ABC Female Youth-B 16,900 10
Aran Sullivan Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-B 16,600 11
Caroline Petterson EarthTreks Golden Female Youth-B 16,000 12
Mia Greene Team BRC Female Youth-B 15,700 13
Tali Maximon Team BRC Female Youth-B 15,200 14
Alena Holbert Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-B 14,500 15
alexis hull Sport Climbing Center Female Youth-B 14,500 16
Gray Freeman Team BRC Female Youth-B 14,100 17
Amanda MacDonald Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-B 13,800 18
Sydney Wanner Sik Bird Female Youth-B 13,800 19
Mia Baud Lakewood Female Youth-B 13,500 20
Katherine Austin Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-B 13,300 21
Melina Michie Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-B 13,000 22
Zoe Hopkins Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-B 12,700 23
Madison Cyr Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-B 12,500 24
Chloe Kim Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-B 12,500 24
Allison Riley Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-B 12,400 26
Margo Salyers Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-B 12,400 26
Anna Vertun Team BRC Female Youth-B 10,900 28
Grace Kelly Team BRC Female Youth-B 10,000 29
Terra Gallegos Lakewood Link Female Youth-B 7,400 30
First Name Last Name Team Name Gender Category Total Points Place
Mia Manson Team Sik Bird Female Youth-C 20,200 1
Corinne Otterness Team ABC Female Youth-C 20,200 2
Phoebe Dolan Team ABC Female Youth-C 19,600 3
Emily Herdic The Spot Female Youth-C 18,000 4
Cadance Hurt Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-C 18,000 5
Ashley Fisher Team ABC Female Youth-C 17,600 6
Mya Ormsbee Team BRC Female Youth-C 15,800 7
Taylor Berry Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-C 15,500 8
Grace Remmert Team BRC Female Youth-C 15,400 9
Caroline Bechtel Team BRC Female Youth-C 14,600 10
Margarite Ford Team BRC Female Youth-C 14,600 11
Grace Ryan EarthTreks Golden Female Youth-C 14,300 12
Olivia Day Team BRC Female Youth-C 14,200 13
Ella Aizeki Team Sik Bird Female Youth-C 14,100 14
Ella Perington Team BRC Female Youth-C 13,900 15
Ona Melvin Lifetime Fitness – Centennial, CO Female Youth-C 13,300 16
Melissa Caid Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-C 12,400 17
Grace Martin Team BRC Female Youth-C 11,800 18
Lauren Choi Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-C 11,300 19
Guilia Leubben Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-C 10,700 20
Ryan Ganjon Female Youth-C 9,500 21
Kayleigh Evans Female Youth-C 8,500 22
Chloe Kusser Female Youth-C 8,500 22
Peyton Roeder Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-C 8,500 24
Kaelyn Harris Team ABC Female Youth-C 6,700 25
Maya Miserlian Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-C 1,100 26
First Name Last Name Team Name Gender Category Total Points Place
Lydia Dolan Team ABC Female Youth-D 18,000 1
Olivia Kosanovich EarthTreks Golden Female Youth-D 18,000 2
Emery Jansen Team Sik Bird Female Youth-D 13,800 3
Kiera Johnson Lifetime Fitness – Centennial, CO Female Youth-D 13,500 4
Klara Meymaris Team ABC Female Youth-D 13,500 4
Kalia O’Brien Team Sik Bird Female Youth-D 13,500 6
Mae Sterner Team ABC Female Youth-D 12,900 7
Isabelle Link Team ABC Female Youth-D 12,400 8
Ceri Evans EarthTreks Golden Female Youth-D 11,500 9
Taryn Chase Rock’n & Jam’n Female Youth-D 11,000 10
Brooklee Baybeck EarthTreks Golden Female Youth-D 10,700 11
Katrina Canfield Team ABC Female Youth-D 10,700 12
Margaux D’Amato Team ABC Female Youth-D 10,020 13
Cate Sarinopoulos Team ABC Female Youth-D 9,800 14
Harper Staunton Sik Bird Female Youth-D 7,400 15
First Name Last Name Team Name Gender Category Total Points Place
Courtney Brown Female Adult 14,800 1
First Name Last Name Team Name Gender Category Total Points Place
Remi Arata Team ABC Male Junior 24,000 1
Ben Lindfors EarthTreks Golden Male Junior 23,500 2
Juan Montoya *None/Not listed Male Junior 22,500 3
Stefan Lavender Team ABC Male Junior 22,300 4
David Bonan Team Sik Bird Male Junior 22,100 5
Brendan Boyd Rock’n & Jam’n Male Junior 20,500 6
Jasper Pont Team BRC Male Junior 20,200 7
Brett Maytubby Team BRC Male Junior 19,700 8
Jacob Kibbee Rock’n & Jam’n Male Junior 19,400 9
Patrick Bodnar City Rock Male Junior 19,200 10
Nick Lyon Male Junior 19,000 11
Thomas Kalina *None/Not listed Male Junior 18,500 12
Wesley White Rock’n & Jam’n Male Junior 18,300 13
Alexi Lainis Team BRC Male Junior 17,700 14
Forrest Denham Male Junior 16,100 15
Tully Henke Male Junior 15,700 16
Bryce Kelly Team BRC Male Junior 15,500 17
Asher Blackburn Team BRC Male Junior 15,500 18
Caleb Vacura Male Junior 14,200 19
Seth Parker Inner Strength Male Junior 11,800 20
Charles Losche EarthTreks Golden Male Junior 11,800 21
First Name Last Name Team Name Gender Category Total Points Place
Jess Walker Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-A 22,400 1
Skyler Bol Inner Strength Male Youth-A 22,400 2
Ryan Mike Team CityROCK Male Youth-A 22,300 3
Max Donovan Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-A 20,400 4
Beckett Aizeki Team Sik Bird Male Youth-A 19,900 5
Raphael Angoulvant Team CityROCK Male Youth-A 19,600 6
Christopher Tomaschow Inner Strength Male Youth-A 19,000 7
Cole Myers Team BRC Male Youth-A 19,000 7
Brian Dalke Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-A 19,000 9
Timmy Dolan Team ABC Male Youth-A 18,500 10
Spencer Platt Team BRC Male Youth-A 18,500 11
Hunter Allen-Bonney Team Sik Bird Male Youth-A 17,800 12
Nathan Dalke Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-A 17,600 13
Kaden Weston Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-A 17,300 14
Skylar Drakos Team Summit Male Youth-A 17,100 15
Chino Davis Team SCC Male Youth-A 15,700 16
Vincent Smith Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-A 14,900 17
First Name Last Name Team Name Gender Category Total Points Place
Daniel Martins Sport Climbing Center Male Youth-B 18,700 1
Mateo Gallegos Team ABC Male Youth-B 18,600 2
Connor Jansen Team Sik Bird Male Youth-B 18,600 3
Devin Wong Team Sik Bird Male Youth-B 18,400 4
Ethan Pitcher Vail Athletic Club Male Youth-B 18,000 5
Will Sharp Team Summit Male Youth-B 17,600 6
Jack Mason Team BRC Male Youth-B 17,600 7
Aspen Sivey Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-B 17,600 8
Hagen Hall EarthTreks Golden Male Youth-B 17,500 9
Austin Leech Team BRC Male Youth-B 17,300 10
Max Manson Team Sik Bird Male Youth-B 17,200 11
Tommy Pasnau Team BRC Male Youth-B 17,200 11
Owen Dehmler-Buckley Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-B 16,600 13
William DeMartino Inner Strength Male Youth-B 16,200 14
Davis Wuthrich Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-B 15,900 15
Henry McGowan Team BRC Male Youth-B 15,900 16
Wilson Schultz EarthTreks Golden Male Youth-B 15,300 17
Mason Smith Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-B 14,600 18
Joel Waits Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-B 14,400 19
Robert Strong Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-B 13,500 20
Damian Ho The Spot Male Youth-B 13,000 21
Sebastion Melendez Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-B 12,400 22
Matthew Lyndon Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-B 11,900 23
Caleb Rider Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-B 11,500 24
Caden Sader Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-B 11,200 25
Damien Moore Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-B 9,600 26
John Fillion Team Evergreen Male Youth-B 9,100 27
Ford Adams Team BRC Male Youth-B 8,600 28
Jack Ganjon Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-B 8,100 29
Gabriel Dupon Miramont Crushers Male Youth-B 5,600 30
First Name Last Name Team Name Gender Category Total Points Place
Colin Duffy Team ABC Male Youth-C 21,500 1
Luke Davison Team ABC Male Youth-C 19,400 2
Brody Nielsen Vail Athletic Club Male Youth-C 18,700 3
Noah Morton Team BRC Male Youth-C 18,600 4
Chris Deuto Team BRC Male Youth-C 18,000 5
Tanner Bauer Team Male Youth-C 18,000 6
Callum Coulson Team BRC Male Youth-C 18,000 7
Jordan Fishman Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-C 17,700 8
Ashtyn Bee Focus Male Youth-C 17,200 9
Noah Rand Team BRC Male Youth-C 14,400 10
Kaedyn Woodard EarthTreks Golden Male Youth-C 14,200 11
Henry Meadows The Spot Male Youth-C 13,900 12
Boston Dunlap Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-C 13,800 13
Liam Sullivan Male Youth-C 13,500 14
Lewis McGowan BRC Male Youth-C 13,500 15
Ben Bicknell Team BRC Male Youth-C 13,300 16
Jack Petterson EarthTreks Golden Male Youth-C 13,000 17
Luke Lowe Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-C 11,200 18
Sergio Delgado Male Youth-C 10,100 19
Christopher Mentzer Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-C 9,600 20
First Name Last Name Team Name Gender Category Total Points Place
Benjamin Dantas Vail Athletic Club Male Youth-D 18,000 1
Sam Kuepper Team BRC Male Youth-D 17,700 2
Lukas Bergsten Vail Athletic Club Male Youth-D 15,800 3
Kaitek Johnston Team BRC Male Youth-D 15,700 4
Austin Reitz City Rock Male Youth-D 15,200 5
Patrick Dobranowski Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-D 13,800 6
Jackson Turner Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-D 12,400 7
St. John Tsuno-Wayne Team BRC Male Youth-D 11,900 8
Finn McDaniel Team ABC Male Youth-D 11,600 9
Dawson Bauer Team BRC Male Youth-D 11,600 9
Connor Falk Vail Athletic Club Male Youth-D 11,600 11
Evan Kuepper Team ABC Male Youth-D 11,100 12
Tyler Corcoran BRC Male Youth-D 10,300 13
Calvin Meymaris ABC Male Youth-D 8,400 14
Zachary Hurd Rock’n & Jam’n Male Youth-D 3,600 15
First Name Last Name Team Name Gender Category Total Points Place
Zach Vose Male Adult 19,800 1
Jeffrey Miller Male Adult 17,200 2
Justin Doss Male Adult 13,800 3
First Name Last Name Team Name Gender Category Total Points Place
Matthew Dalton Male Open 21,200 1

North Vs South Competition Recap

On August 2nd the ROCK’n & JAM’n Youth Teams took part in the summer competition: “North vs. South”.  It was a chance for our Youth Team members from both facilities to challenge each other in both a battle of boulders and ropes.  The RJ setting crew put up fresh routes and boulders that were fair to individuals of all heights. Boulder problems ranged from V0 to V9, and routes from 5.6 to 5.13.

RJ1&2TeamPhoto.jpg

 

The day started off early at 8:30 AM when 60 Youth Team members showed up at the front doors, ready to put the “other gym” members in their place. The RJ1 youth felt a little pressure as the RJ2 youth members walked through the front doors, and onto their home turf. There were lots of smiles, but you could tell from the look in each varsity team member’s eyes, that they were here to do business.

 

After everyone warmed up, the coaches rallied the group into the lead cave for a quick meeting to go over the rules. Competitors were given 2.5 hours to attempt to get their three highest scores, with one score being a boulder, one a route, and the third whatever they wanted. This was in hopes that our strong boulderers would fair evenly against our strong rope climbers. Upon completion of the rules, the climbers scattered and began their first warm-up climbs. While the younger and newer competitors were running to get on their climbs, varsity athletes, well rehearsed in the battle of previous competitions, quickly began to work their strategies. The Varsity Team’s training philosophy is to “Cry in the Dojo, so that you may laugh on the battlefield!”

 

Not long into the competition climbers began talking of glorious sends, and sad defeats; of tried cruxes, and slimy slopers. Some team members strategized with teammates on which route they would have to complete next in order to top the score of “so-and-so” from the other team. Spectators and coaches could hear the friendly banter of teammates as they challenged each other to which route they could flash.

 

Team members were quick to seek out the hardest routes and boulder problems in the gym and  began to lay siege to the complicated sequences the setters had created during the week.  First was Jake Kibbee from the Varsity Team at RJ2, who blazed the path with a flash of the two hardest boulder problems. Brendan Boyd from the RJ1 Varsity Team followed that up with a flash of the second hardest route on lead. The young athletes from both gyms were sending problems and routes left and right.

 

Coaches and parents watched in awe, cheering wildly as their climbers put forth their best efforts on the climbing wall. Many Youth Team members achieved personal bests by climbing some of the hardest and most challenging routes they have climbed in their young careers.

 

While the competitor’s scores were tallied, the youth and parents passed time by participating in and watching some speed bouldering. This was the first time that the setting crew created this event at an RJ competition. They set two identical boulder problems at the base of the lead cave. Two competitors would step forward to the start and take their position on the start holds. The crowd would count down, and the competitors would then race to the the finishing hold. The first competitor to get both of their hands on the finishing hold was the victor. Check out the video of “Brendan vs. Brendan” to watch Brendan win, and also to see what speed bouldering is all about. It might make another appearance at our next member event!

North Vs. South 2014 Results

Female

Male

Points

JUNIOR

Points

JUNIOR

1

1

4200

Jake Kibbee

2

2

3

3

4

4

5

5

YOUTH A

YOUTH A

1

2850

Rachel Cohen

1

4300

Brendan Boyd

2

2550

Camille Garcia

2

4150

Jess Walker

3

2550

Sara Sarno

3

2250

Rowan Rawlinson

4

2450

Nadine Wong

4

5

2450

Emma Binder

5

YOUTH B

YOUTH B

1

2750

Aran Sullivan

1

3950

Max Donovan

2

2100

Margo Saylers

2

3450

Kaden Weston

3

1950

Melina Michie

3

3200

Brenden Jennings

4

4

3150

Ian Center

5

5

3100

Owen Dehmler-Buckley

YOUTH C

YOUTH C

1

3500

Iza Nowak

1

2450

Seth Allen

2

2850

Amanda Macdonald

2

2350

Trace Rindal

3

2850

Taylor Berry

3

2300

Jordan Fishman

4

2350

Madison Cyr

4

1250

Nate Wilking

5

1850

Emily Munch

5

1250

Liam Sullivan

YOUTH D

YOUTH D

1

2250

Giulia Luebben

1

2100

Harrison Roth

2

2150

Taryn Chase

2

1800

Noah Wiidakas

3

1800

Sophia Holmstedt

3

1750

Josef Fligg

4

1600

Lexi Roybal

4

1500

David Gallas

5

1550

Cordelia Valdivia

5

950

Evan Harris

Full Results

 

Place

Place

1

4150

Emma Binder

Youth A, (98-99)

1

6850

Jake Kibbee

Junior, (96-97)

2

3950

Rachel Cohen

Youth A, (98-99)

1

12550

Jess Walker

Youth A, (98-99)

3

3750

Camille Garcia

Youth A, (98-99)

2

5400

Brendan Boyd

Youth A, (98-99)

4

3600

Kacie Palmer

Youth A, (98-99)

3

2250

Rowan Rawlinson

Youth A, (98-99)

5

3100

Sarah Michie

Youth A, (98-99)

4

0

Wes White

Youth A, (98-99)

6

3100

Sara Sarno

Youth A, (98-99)

5

0

Brian Dalke

Youth A, (98-99)

7

2450

Nadine Wong

Youth A, (98-99)

6

0

Nathan Dalke

Youth A, (98-99)

8

1600

Madison King

Youth A, (98-99)

7

0

Quinton Center

Youth A, (98-99)

9

1400

Maddy McCullor

Youth A, (98-99)

1

7800

Max Donovan

Youth B, (00-01)

10

0

Sara Denhoffer

Youth A, (98-99)

2

5050

Ian Center

Youth B, (00-01)

1

5500

Margo Saylers

Youth B, (00-01)

3

5000

Vinnie Smith

Youth B, (00-01)

2

3400

Aran Sullivan

Youth B, (00-01)

4

4200

Kaden Weston

Youth B, (00-01)

3

2450

Melina Michie

Youth B, (00-01)

5

4150

Aspen Sivey

Youth B, (00-01)

4

0

Allison Riley

Youth B, (00-01)

6

3950

Owen Dehmler-Buckley

Youth B, (00-01)

5

0

Alena Holbert

Youth B, (00-01)

7

3550

Matthew Lyndon

Youth B, (00-01)

6

0

Mackenzie Whitehead-Bust

Youth B, (00-01)

8

3200

Brendan Jennings

Youth B, (00-01)

7

0

Chloe Kim

Youth B, (00-01)

9

3050

Damien Moore

Youth B, (00-01)

8

0

Meg Wyman

Youth B, (00-01)

10

2700

Joel Waits

Youth B, (00-01)

9

0

Zoe Hopkins

Youth B, (00-01)

11

2600

Caleb Rider

Youth B, (00-01)

1

5900

Iza Nowak

Youth C, (02-03)

12

0

Mason Smith

Youth B, (00-01)

2

4900

Taylor Berry

Youth C, (02-03)

13

0

Davis Wuthrich

Youth B, (00-01)

3

4400

Amanda Macdonald

Youth C, (02-03)

14

0

Evan Bland

Youth B, (00-01)

4

3550

Madison Cyr

Youth C, (02-03)

15

0

Dheergayu Montanero

Youth B, (00-01)

5

2850

Emily Munch

Youth C, (02-03)

16

0

Sam Winzez

Youth B, (00-01)

6

0

Rachel Junge

Youth C, (02-03)

1

5950

Trace Rindal

Youth C, (02-03)

7

0

Cadance Hurt

Youth C, (02-03)

2

5550

Seth Allen

Youth C, (02-03)

8

0

Maya Miserlian

Youth C, (02-03)

3

4050

Jordan Fishman

Youth C, (02-03)

9

0

Gracie Dahlgren

Youth C, (02-03)

4

1750

Jack Eddington

Youth C, (02-03)

10

0

Breck Dahlgren

Youth C, (02-03)

5

1700

Robbie Clark

Youth C, (02-03)

11

0

Melissa Caid

Youth C, (02-03)

6

1600

Nate Wilking

Youth C, (02-03)

1

5700

Tayrn Chase

Youth D, (04+)

7

1250

Liam Sullivan

Youth C, (02-03)

2

4000

Sophia Holmstedt

Youth D, (04+)

8

1150

Marcus Smith

Youth C, (02-03)

3

3100

Lexi Roybal

Youth D, (04+)

9

0

Luke Peterson

Youth C, (02-03)

4

2600

Cordelia Valdivia

Youth D, (04+)

10

0

Nathan Farina

Youth C, (02-03)

5

2250

Giulia Luebben

Youth D, (04+)

11

0

Nathan Walleen

Youth C, (02-03)

6

2050

Maddie Holmes

Youth D, (04+)

12

0

Drew Albanese

Youth C, (02-03)

7

1450

Julia Fligg

Youth D, (04+)

1

3750

Harrison Roth

Youth D, (04+)

8

900

Hannah Williams

Youth D, (04+)

2

3400

Josef Fligg

Youth D, (04+)

9

675

Allie Holmes

Youth D, (04+)

3

3400

Noah Wiidakas

Youth D, (04+)

10

150

Marrisa McCullor

Youth D, (04+)

4

2225

David Gallas

Youth D, (04+)

11

0

Zoe Scarborough

Youth D, (04+)

5

1650

Evan Harris

Youth D, (04+)

12

0

Julia Hamilton

Youth D, (04+)

6

1250

Tanner Gallas

Youth D, (04+)

13

0

Julia Nichols

Youth D, (04+)

7

850

Greyson Wiidakas

Youth D, (04+)

14

0

Rohanna Hasselkus

Youth D, (04+)

8

675

Jackson Holynski

Youth D, (04+)

15

0

Jessica Wilcox

Youth D, (04+)

9

550

Bradley Snedden

Youth D, (04+)

16

0

Bella Mills

Youth D, (04+)

10

150

Alex Snedden

Youth D, (04+)

17

0

Meghan Dorneden

Youth D, (04+)

11

0

Robert Baker

Youth D, (04+)

12

0

Cooper Hart

Youth D, (04+)

13

0

Oliver Hesselberth

Youth D, (04+)

14

0

Keegan Albrighton

Youth D, (04+)

15

0

Josh Feld

Youth D, (04+)

16

0

Patrick Dobranowski

Youth D, (04+)

17

0

Ben Maggard

Youth D, (04+)

In the Team Point battle RJ2 (Centennial) beat RJ1 (Thornton), but the war is not over!  A trophy will be displayed at the south gym – where it will be on loan (until the two teams meet again)!

 

So if you’re at RJ1 this week or next, be on the lookout for the route cards from the youth comp. The climbs are still up on the walls – to give you all an idea of what the Youth Team members are capable of. Try to flash the same problems as Jake and Brendan!

Comp_08.jpg

Comp_13.jpg

 

TFC_9685 copy.jpg

RJ1Panorama.jpg

We Are Climbing

After months of work we are psyched to go live with our new video. Peep it here:

Shooting the video was fun and it was awesome to see so many of our customers show up to be a part of it. The folks at Mind Frame Cinema ran the show like the well-oiled movie-making machine they are, and pizza and PBR were enjoyed by all. The number of hours that went into creating a one minute clip is staggering, though hard work paid off and the final result is something we can all be proud of.

Why did we make the video? We wanted to show everyone how much we care about climbing, how much it permeates our lifestyle and way of thinking. Most of all we wanted to highlight the community that has both built our gyms and been built by our gyms, as well as other facilities across the Front Range. The Mind Frame Cinema brain trust have a long history with RJ, as do all the climbers, employees, and former employees featured within the video.

Co-owner Anna Parker puts it best:

“I wasn’t quite sure what the end result would be. But, now that it’s said and done, it really came through with a clear message. Every time I watch it, I feel humbled and proud at the same time. I would assume that some people go a lifetime not being part of a close-knit community. That being said, we came to Colorado following a dream and what we found was a group of really awesome people. And that group isn’t just limited to R&J staff and members and friends, but also everyone we’ve gotten to share a story with. The video reminds me of who we are, what we do, and the passion for a sport that we all love: climbing. I want to thank everyone again who were involved in making it.”

Well said, Anna. Well said.

 

willful suspension of disbelief

willful suspension of disbelief…according to wikipedia, this can be “seen as the willingness of the audience to overlook the limitations of a medium, so that these do not interfere with the acceptance of those premises.” you might now be asking yourself, “what does this have to do with anything here in the gym” or “how does this even remotely relate to climbing?”

it might take a little bit, but i can explain. the short, vague, non-helpful explanation is that it relates to route setting.

the long explanation:

when you, our customers and members, come into the gym, you see specific features everywhere (layback crack, offwidth crack, stem chimney, pin scars, etc.) and you most definitely see routes going through and around all of these. and you probably think (sometimes) “that seems really contrived, why would i stay on these bad holds when i can reach that feature instead.”

as route setters, we of course see these same features, but we see them in a different way. we don’t necessarily see them as continuous. in other words, we block out the other parts of the feature in order to achieve the particular flow or movement for our climb. if we didn’t look at the features this way, we would be limited with what we could set and would always have to be hyper-cognizant of the proximity to said features. for example, in the front canyon at the north gym we have a really good layback crack; at the south gym right by the front desk we have a splitter crack. if the climbs we set near these always had all features on from bottom to top, it has the potential to be essentially the same climb every time. we would be doing you a disservice by allowing this to happen. we want to mix things up and keep you on your toes (no pun intended).

so it takes a willful suspension of disbelief in order to see the routes in the same way we do. using your imagination and “pretending” that only the specific taped-off portions of a feature exist, not the full thing, is necessary at times. our hope is that it yields more interesting climbs with more satisfying movement and body positions. of course, nobody is going to stop you from climbing straight up the crack. but honestly, how many times could you continuously climb it before you got a little bored 🙂

geeking out on climbing

i believe i am reaching a new level of climbing geek-dom with this post. i started thinking about the different shoes i have worn over the years. this lead to me thinking about what shoes i was wearing for certain sends and milestones and breakthroughs. i was surprised, and somewhat embarrassed, to realize that i remember a large number of these shoe-milestone combinations.

flashback to christmas 2005, and i’m on a trip to the southeast, climbing at horse pens 40. my whole goal for the ten day trip was to do a v5. i had a pair of mad rock mugens (the all white ones) that didn’t fit my feet quite right. so i went to the general store and talked to big mike and walked out with a pair of evolv defy’s. during the remainder of the trip, i managed to send ‘bum boy’ (v4) and eked out my first v5, ‘slag’.

now it’s the summer of 2007, i’m living here in colorado and have been putting in some time in boulder canyon. i sent my first 5.12a in a pair of five ten anasazi velcro’s. fall of that same year, i sent two 5.12s on the same day (in rifle, no less) in a pair of la sportiva testarosas. first 5.13a, again, the testarosas.

fall of 2009, and i’m in kentucky at the red river gorge for two weeks. probably my best two week stretch of climbing, with several 5.12b flashes, two 5.13a redpoints, a 5.12d onsight (just the highlights). the weapon of choice this time around was a pair of five ten dragons.

recently, evolv has supported me and over the last several years have helped me break into new grades (optimus prime lace up, talon, shaman).

you get the idea…a lot of brain power and space dedicated to something with no value whatsoever, but for some reason i remember these things.

i’m sure everyone has their own neurotic tendencies when it comes to climbing. feel free to post comments with your own habits and neuroses…

hard or easy for the grade?

what makes a route hard or easy for its specified grade? how can one route rated 5.10d (just as an example) be so much easier or harder than another route also rated 5.10d?

unfortunately, the answer is not simple. many factors contribute to a route’s difficulty, and many of these factors can combine in odd and unique ways. let’s list some of these factors:

  1. hold size: obviously, the smaller the hold, whether for hand or foot, the harder it will be to use.
  2. hold type: jugs, crimps, slopers, pinches
  3. hold orientation: in order of easiest to use…straight down pull, side pull, undercling, gaston (reverse side pull).
  4. wall angle: this one is subjective. the angle can range from slab (less than vertical), to vertical, to overhanging, and depending on your specific physical strengths and weaknesses, any of these could be harder than the other.
  5. distance between holds: the farther apart they are, typically the harder the move.

once you start looking at combinations of these factors, things get complicated. so when evaluating the grade of a route, it is extremely important to think about and consider all of these factors, especially as they relate to what your own strengths and weaknesses are. i will use myself as an example.

i am not a very good ‘technical’ climber. when things get less vertical and the holds get small, i tend to climb quite poorly. i started climbing at the red river gorge, in southeastern kentucky. for those of you that have climbed there, ‘technical’ is not really the name of the game. techniques such as ‘grip it and rip it’ or ‘yank and yard’ are much more suitable. so when more than that is required, things get difficult for me. but i know this about myself.

so, in rifle, where the lines are steep and powerful, i have redpointed 5.13c. in shelf, however, where the lines are vertical or slabby, and the holds are thin, requiring delicate balance and movement, i have only redpointed 5.12b. quite a disparity! but i adjust my expectations accordingly. in rifle, if i don’t on-sight or flash 5.12a, i’m upset. but when in shelf, i shift my expectations, and am happy just to do 5.12a. and believe me, it doesn’t happen often! to be such a talented climber as to be good at all styles, i believe, is a bit of a rare thing, especially as the climbing gets more difficult and the grades increase.

“how does this relate to what happens at the gym,” you might ask. well first and foremost, it is important to remember that grades are very subjective. there are so many climbers of differing sizes and strengths. if the routes in the gym were to stay up for a really long time, we would eventually get a true consensus on what the grade actually is. much like long-standing routes outside, that have become ‘benchmark’ routes of their respective grades. but, we don’t have that luxury inside. you, our customers, would get bored with the routes and all the holds would be really greasy. plus, we (the routesetters) would be out of jobs!

the second thing to take away from this is that with many different setters, we have many different setting styles. sometimes there are very straight-forward climbs, and sometimes there are more technical and devious climbs. sometimes you’re making big moves on big holds, other times you might have to trust bad foot smears with small hand holds. one setter’s style might be typically hard for you, while another setter’s style might just suit you to a ‘t’. different strokes for different folks.

the third thing to take away from this is that if a route isn’t ‘straight-forward,’ perhaps it can teach you something. i think this point is extremely important. this is up for debate, but i believe that by the time you hit 5.12c, perhaps 5.12d, you have seen all the different types of moves you will encounter while climbing. as the grades get harder, you will see more difficult combinations of these moves, and the holds will most likely get smaller and/or farther apart. to me, this means that even if you have redpointed up to 5.12a or 5.12b, you can probably still learn a thing or two (or more).

with that in mind, some routes that we set might have movement that is either completely foreign to you or seems to be really difficult for your typical style of climbing. it doesn’t necessarily mean that the route is harder than the suggested grade. it could be perfectly reasonable movement for the grade, and this could be an opportunity for you to get introduced to it. these situations can prove that grading something at or above ones limit is really difficult. realize that as you get more acquainted with a certain grade (read: climb that grade A LOT), you can more accurately assess the grades around it. this, of course, takes time. and if you think about it in simple terms, who is more ‘qualified’ to comment on something graded 5.10d: someone who has climbed over 100 5.10d’s in different areas and gyms *or* someone who has climbed 5 5.10d’s at one area or gym.

so before you mark a certain grade on the customer rating sheets, think about all of the factors touched on above. doing so can help the grades in the gym be a little bit more consistent. of course, we (as setters) aren’t perfect. but we don’t miss and/or sandbag our grades ALL the time…

behind the wrenches, an exclusive behind the scenes look

let me set up a scenario for you: you get out early from work or school on friday, perhaps the weather isn’t looking too great for the weekend, and a quick sesh at the gym seems like the best option. you’re super psyched because it’s only 1230 and the gym probably just opened. you pull into the parking lot and see plenty of other cars; maybe it’s already packed in there because everyone else had the same plan as you did. you walk up to the door and pull but GASP…it’s locked! you cup your hands around your eyes to get a better view, and sure enough, there are people climbing in there. you pull again, but yup, still locked. what’s going on?!!?!?!

behind those locked doors are the fearless ROCK’n & JAM’n routesetters, fully immersed in a cave and high volume setting day. these are the days that we take the extra time to set in the lead cave as well as catch up on some easier graded routes that have been overlooked over the past weeks. for example, on friday january 6, 2012, there were 5 setters, ng, jg, cc, la, and khn. between us, 9 routes were set. now i can’t personally take credit for the volume (neither can corey) as we got the cave routes (more on that later). but lucas and keith each bucked up and set 2 routes apiece, while nathan was the real champ racking up 3 routes! he counted up all the holds and found he had bolted 156 holds to the wall. 156! and a lot of the holds that these guys used had to be washed. they went up and down their ropes a lot! after a while, even in the most comfortable harness, limbs start to go numb. plus hauling heavy buckets, filled to the brim with holds, up and down the walls can get a bit tiring, to say the least.

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nathan on rope and ladder stripping and re-setting the 5.5, 5.6 and 5.7 on the slab wall

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nathan hauling a big feature up the slab wall

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gotta make sure you choose good holds. so many options...

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5.12+ in the making. just need to come up with a sequence.

then there are the ladders. they have names at rj1. our largest ladder is a 35 ft extension ladder named ‘widow maker’. i can’t say exactly how heavy this beast is, but a typical ladder of this size clocks in around 85 lbs. and this isn’t a comfortable 85 lbs. our second largest ladder (and the only other one to earn a name) is a 32 ft extension ladder named ‘bertha’. she is definitely the little sister of ‘widow maker’, but is a force to be reckoned with all the same. a typical 32 footer weighs around 70 lbs. now we’re certainly not the largest guys around, but 4 days a week we’re hauling and moving these babies around. you get good at finding balance points quickly, otherwise you’re dropping the ladder onto the mats.

so on a day like january 6, corey and i got to use the big ladders, since we were setting in the cave. i started out with ‘widow’, corey on ‘bertha’. we got them into the cave and started stripping our routes. at this point, you might ask yourself: ‘what about the really steep section of the cave? the wall doesn’t seem vertical enough to get the ladder to prop up against it.’ i was getting to that…you essentially pin the top of the ladder against the roof, and weight it enough to allow it to sink and shift into a stable position. and sometimes it decides to sink and shift a little when you’re higher up which usually induces a bit of terror and a minor panic attack in me. other setters reactions may differ. and it gets really fun when you’re hauling up a heavy hold or a large volume.

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corey on 'bertha', in the roof

once on your ladder, you may realize that the section of wall you need to either strip or set on, is too far away from your ‘comfortable’ perch. so you have to squeeze your upper body through the rungs and lean through to the other side of the ladder. this to me is absolutely terrifying, but sometimes it’s what the job requires. january 6 had it’s fair share of these maneuvers. and we were able to set both of our routes without the use of a rope, which is a rare but exciting feat to accomplish. of course, it required standing near the very top of a fully extended ‘widow maker’. but it’s just another day on the job.

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me through the rungs near the top of 'widow maker', close to the top of the lead cave

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corey on 'widow maker'

i guess that’s it for this episode of behind the wrenches. hopefully this gives you, our faithful members and guests, a small bit of insight into what goes on during our typical setting sessions. we certainly have off days, sometimes you just don’t feel like you have good moves. it happens. and we do need to hear about it. many times, though, that’s the only feedback we hear. keep in mind that some positive feedback from time to time lets us know what kinds of movement and climbing styles you guys enjoy, and also lets us know that all of the effort we put worth week in and week out isn’t all in vain.

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3 brand new slab climbs (green, white and orange @ 5.7, 5.6 and 5.5 respectively)

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straight up the center, red 5.11 (corey) and white 5.12+ (jamie)

gear review – evolv shaman

This past spring, Evolv released the much-anticipated Shaman, a high-performance, steep bouldering and sport-climbing shoe, designed from scratch by Chris Sharma. The basics include: three Velcro straps to secure the shoe, a fairly severe down-turned toe, leather upper in the front of the shoe, cotton around the heel, the “knuckle box” above the big toe, and the “love bump” midsole. Retail price is $145, and they can be ordered/purchased through ROCK’n & JAM’n (see counter staff for more details), from Evolv directly, or from Bent Gate Mountaineering.
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First things first, these are not “beginners” shoes. These are meant for climbers looking for a very high-performance shoe. That being said, after climbing in these shoes for the past two months, I have to say that they perform brilliantly on the terrain they are geared toward. The middle Velcro strap helps keep the middle of the shoe and the heel “suctioned” to your foot, making foot placements, heel hooks, and heel scums feel extremely secure. And with the non-stretching cotton heel, there is no sliding around on the inside, either. The “knuckle box” gives your big toe extra room, and in conjunction with the “love bump”, allows your toes to curl without sacrificing comfort. In other words, you don’t have to downsize these shoes to make them perform at the highest of levels. I personally wear a size 9 street shoe and sized my Shaman’s at an 8½. I feel like they can “grab” any foothold they need to, and I’m not doubled over in pain at the thought of slipping the shoes on. The rubber is extremely sticky yet durable, and will give you the necessary confidence even on the most marginal smears. I would say, pound for pound, these shoes compete with any of the top rated shoes for steep bouldering and sport-climbing. They have become my shoe of choice for absolutely everything past vertical. So if you’re drawn to the overhung rock, from 5.9 to 5.14 or v0 to v14, give ‘em a shot; you won’t be disappointed.

(Note: as with any shoe, you should try it on beforehand, if possible. But if you have had a pair of Evolv shoes before, they should be sized the same as the Optimus Prime or Talon, or ½ a size larger than the Defy or Pontas)

Comparable shoes: La Sportiva Solution, Five Ten Team 5.10

And the Winners Are…

First, a big ‘thank you’ is in order for everyone who made it out to Winter Wonderland despite the frigid temperatures and frosty driving conditions. So, thank you. Second, here are the top three finishers (sometimes referred to as ‘winners’) from each category:

Youth:

Colin Duffy (2168)

Mikey Lowe (1775)

Aliza Nishke (1754)

Women’s Recreational:

Jenna Park (2384 + Moonboard Climb-off)

Chelsea Battan (2384)

Men’s Recreational:

Emilio Espinoza (1627)

Women’s Intermediate:

Charise Denavit (3561)

Men’s Intermediate:

Walter Wood (4820)

Patrick Radecker (4660)

Daniel Hayes (4562)

Women’s Advanced:

Jacinda Maurer (5180)

Rochelle Rocha (3026)

Men’s Advanced:

Osiris Graves (6779)

Kevin Rust (6611)

Jamison Burt (6591)

Women’s Open:

Mercedes Pollmeier (5412)

Men’s Open:

Seth Lytton (8118 + 33 pullups)

Asher Shay-Nemirow (8118 + 24 pullups)

Jamie Emerson (7826)

Masters:

Silvia Luebben (4485)

Gary DeGroat (4203)

Hillary Nitshke (2089)

Photos of all the sports action are posted on our Facebook page. Thanks again to everyone who came!

Coming Soon to an RJ Near You

Bouldering League!

Yes, fall Bouldering League is right around the corner. Starting in October, the League will be taking over the boulder at both gyms. Sign up, hang out with friends, meet some great new people, and enjoy the delectible boulder problems prepared fresh each week by our top movement chefs.

Look for more details in the coming weeks, including times, scoring format, and info on the end-of-League party!

Belay-bor Pains Part 2

Moving right along.

Why can’t I stand 20 feet away from the wall while belaying?

One reason is that it creates more slack in the climber/belayer system which can have dire consequences for both top roping and leading. If you are top roping at RJ1, you will be climbing on walls that are 37 feet tall with ropes that are about 80 feet long, allowing for about 6 feet of slack to be lying on the mats. If you lower your climber while standing 20 feet away from the wall, you run the risk of running the end of the rope through the belay device, thereby dropping your partner on the ground. One way to avoid this would be to tie a knot on the end of the belay side of the rope. The other way is, obviously, stand no more than a few feet away from the wall.

Belaying from a distance has undesirable effects when it comes to lead climbing as well. First of all, like our top roping scenario, it creates extra slack in the system. Imagine someone that weighs 120 lbs lead belaying their partner that weighs 150 lbs. The belayer is 20 feet away from the wall and the climber has extra slack out because he is attempting to clip the third clip. The climber pumps out and misses the clip. The belayer, being outweighed by 30 lbs, can’t arrest the fall and gets yanked into the wall while the climber splats on the ground because of the extra slack in the system.

Now, let’s reverse the situation. We have a 120 lb climber and a 150 lb belayer standing 20 feet away from the wall. We have the same scenario with the climber taking a bunch of slack out to clip the third clip but falls before he can make it. This time, the unlucky climber gets slammed crotch first onto a taut rope. I’m sure many of you know what I’m talking about. Still not a pleasant situation.

Another major problem with standing too far away from the wall on a lead belay is the wear it causes on the first biner. By standing far away from the wall, the rope bends around the biner with a more acute angle, causing serious friction between the metal and the usually dirty sheath. A nice notch will eventually be worn into the biner, usually with some nice sharp edges. Please go here to see a great post from Black Diamond on what can happen when climbing on a biner with rope wear.

The most common reason people give in our gym about why they want to stand so far away from the wall on a lead belay is that they can’t see the climber otherwise. There’s a simple solution to this. If you can’t see your climber, simply turn around and face out from the wall. See below.

37I love everything about this picture. Kathryn is facing out to see her climber, her stance shows that she’s ready for anything, she has a moderate amount of slack out and she is giving her undivided attention to her climber. Which brings us to our last question.

Why can’t I sit on the mat while I belay?

Several reasons. You can’t lock off as well. You can’t move quickly if you need to. You can not give any semblance of a dynamic lead belay while sitting down. And most importantly to me, sitting down conveys a sense of complacency. Unless you are flying the space shuttle, most people sit down to relax. Belaying is absolutely not a passive activity. Compare the picture below to the one of Kathryn. Who would you want belaying you? (Disclaimer: Katie never belays sitting down, I made her pose for the picture)

38Some further reading on the subject of sitting down while belaying can be found at rockclimbing.com (caution, there’s some foul language in this one) and rockandice.com has a post that spells out some great belaying tips in general.

There was a thread on Facebook recently in which someone was discussing the fact that he just saw another person get decked in a gym. The guy got away with just a broken ankle. One of my friends made a comment which sums this whole post nicely: “Belaying is a job and should be taken seriously. Focus.”

Climbing is obviously an inherently risky activity to engage in. Even though you can never erase all risk from climbing, we want you to know that every rule we have in this gym is designed to minimize the risk of climbing as much as we possibly can. If you ever have any questions, please come up and ask one of our staff members, it’s what we are here for.

Belay-bor Pains Part 1

I’m going to go ahead and say it – IMHO belaying sucks. Yes, I admit it is a major part of our sport that builds bonds that will last throughout the years, but it has it’s definite drawbacks. It makes your neck ache. The rope trashes your hands. It’s boring. And you can often spend an egregious amount of time belaying your buddy while he hangdogs every clip instead of sending your own project. But in spite of all this, passing the belay test is what every first time climber focuses on. It is as important to them as getting to the top of the wall. And while it is a skill that is very easy to learn, tragedy can strike if you falter, even for a microsecond. At ROCK’n & JAM’n, we do our very best to make sure that everyone belaying in our facilities does it correctly and safely. Rest assured that we have our eyes on you and will come up and correct you if we deem it necessary. Our staff has encountered almost every mistake imaginable. Brian even got to step in and rectify a hip belay debacle once (for the record, not allowed in any gym I know of). In light of this, I’ve put together a Belaying FAQs post for your enjoyment. Read on.

Why do I have to belay off the belay loop? I think two points of contact are safer.

This a topic that can make people get hot under the collar. But no matter what your stance is on this, every harness manufacturer that includes a belay loop on their harness will instruct you in the manual that comes with your purchase to belay off the belay loop, not the two points of contact. As an example, this is taken from the Arc’teryx harness instruction manual:

Attach all belay and rappel devices to the belay loop with a locking carabiner. The belay loop is engineered for extreme structural strength, (>15kN/ 3350 lbf), equal to the main harness structure, and when used correctly for belaying and rappelling provides a safer two-point load.

What this means is that when you use the belay loop instead of the two capture points on your harness, you reduce the risk of cross loading the biner. If you look at your locking biner that you use to belay, you will see a series of little drawings on one side depicting the amount of force it can withstand depending on the biner’s orientation. The one I’m looking at right now shows 23kN from end to end and 7kN from gate to side – a whopping 70% reduction.

Bottom line, it’s a good idea to check the manual and follow it for all your equipment.

Some further reading that I found on this subject can be found here and a fun discussion thread can be found here.

I see people belaying differently, which way is safer?

This one doesn’t have a definite answer. Some gyms flat out ban certain ways of belaying while others just want to make sure you are in control of the brake side at all times. We fall into the latter category – we just want to see confident and controlled belaying. This includes never taking your brake hand off the rope and also staying in a locked off position with your brake hand below the mouth of the belay device approximately 99.99% of the duration of the climb.

There are two main ways of belaying that I know of, and there are several variations on these two main themes. Below is a video of the “pinch” method of belaying. Please note how Samantha raises the brake side of the rope up to meet her left hand, pinches both ropes with her left hand over her brake hand and slides her brake hand down the rope and goes back to her lock off position.

Some people don’t approve of this method for several reasons: you have the brake hand above the mouth of the belay device for a relatively long time, it’s easy to get confused and pinch the ropes below the brake hand instead of over forcing the belayer to take their brake hand off, and most beginner belayers do not move back to their lock off position between periods of taking up slack. However, Samantha is belaying confidently and staying locked off between periods of taking up slack, thereby using this method in a safe manner. For the record, this is the way I’ve belayed for 17 years.

At both R&J gyms, we prefer to teach this method:

We don’t have a name for this, so Nate would like to call it the squat technique since most people get very confused about how to manage the ropes and their limbs at the same time, thereby inducing excessive squatting while belaying. Dede, however, makes this method look casual. It keeps the rope in a locked off position for a longer amount of time and promotes good belaying habits by teaching the belayer to stay locked off. It also seems to be easier to learn and takes less coordination to master.

Again, either of these methods are acceptable at R&J as long as you convey to us that you are in control of the situation.

That’s it for now, stay tuned for part 2.

Fashion Passion

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It is the most common question I get when someone calls in to sign up for our Introductory Lesson. – “What do I wear?”. It’s a serious question that deserves a sincere answer. My well rehearsed statement goes something like this, “Wear something you can move comfortably in that can get ripped up and that has an inseam long enough to extend past the leg loops of your harness.” It’s a pretty general statement that could cover a lot of ensembles.

Virtually every other sport out there has a recognizable uniform of some type, even at the amateur level. Even bowling. Honestly, it could be the reason climbing is not an Olympic sport yet. (ok, maybe not) Our sport is a fashion free-for-all that has even sparked some controversy as of late. But my intention isn’t to be the one to come up with said uniform. I would simply like to point the fashion curious (or challenged) in at least a direction – hopefully the right one. But first, let’s take a look at the attire of the giants on whose shoulders we stand.

Athletic attire obviously improved for us climbers over the past century. Can you imagine trying to send the Naked Edge in a tweed jacket? Or even hiking anywhere in a wool maxi skirt? Sheez.

When you are looking for that special look that will help you send your latest project, you have some choices. You can scoff at the idea of climbing specific clothes and wear whatever you feel most comfortable in; you can wear generic workout clothes that can be interchanged with other activities such as yoga; or you can buy from a handful of companies that try to target the climbing communities needs. The plus side of buying from a climbing clothing company is that some of them actually understand what you need from your clothes, like the fact that women climbers have to buy shirts two sizes too big in order to accommodate their overgrown lats that normal women don’t have.

If you’re looking at purchasing actual climbing clothes, I would have to say that Verve clothing, owned by Christian Griffith, is your best bet. Ladies, Christian not only has a selection of pants that are guaranteed to flatter any shape out there but also makes the best sports bras. Ever. Do yourself a favor and pick up some Verve wear, you’ll never go back. I personally recommend the Sapho capri and the Sandrine pant. For the boys, the Belikos pants climb great, look great and last forever.

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The author in Verve Sapho capri pants, looking a little too much like Waldo.

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Rylan, one of RJ's route setters, climbing in Verve Belikos.

And there’s Prana. I’m not sure if there is a climber in Colorado that doesn’t own at least one piece of Prana clothing. They have a great selection and their clothes are durable enough to withstand many days if not years at the crag. But they have undergone some changes in the past few years since they were bought by Liz Claiborne in 2005. The biggest problem I have with Prana is that the sizing is crazy. I have in my closet right now a collection of Prana pants that span four different sizes that all fit good. Because of this, I do not recommend buying from them online – go to the store in Boulder or an REI and try on whatever it is you want to buy. As of late though, I have found myself tending towards their casual line and foregoing the active wear for other brands.

A couple of other companies to check out are Moon Climbing, Stonewear Designs, Arc’teryx and Mammut – all working hard to make sure you look your best while trying your hardest. Whatever your preference, we hope to see you crushing soon at the gym!

Leading – The Holy Grail of Indoor Climbing

Passing your first lead test at your home gym is a milestone that many climbers don’t forget. My first lead test was at the Boulder Rock Club with Chris Wall judging my performance. To say I was daunted is an understatement, which is why giving shy new climbers their first lead test is one of my favorite things to do. This is for anyone who is contemplating taking their lead test at one of our gyms in the near future.

FAQ’s

1. Why do I have to lead a 5.9? We chose that grade for a couple of reasons. Leading is obviously a harder way to climb since you have to know some pretty advanced climbing techniques, like how to let go with one hand, keep your balance and fumble with a rope at the same time without falling. We feel that a climber that can flash a 5.9 should have the climbing skills needed to safely lead in our gym. Another reason is simply the layout of the leadable walls in our gym. Most of our draws are pretty steep terrain, meaning that setting anything easier than a 5.9 is difficult. At the time of writing this, we have 2 leadable 5.8’s in the gym. If you have to struggle up a 5.8, you will have slim pickens for what you can even lead in the gym.

2. Why is the lead test where it is? We chose the lead test locations for a couple of reasons too. First, we want to see that you are comfortable flashing a 5.9 on lead at the gym. To do this, we moved the test route to a wall that is lead only so that the climber won’t have as much of a chance to wire out the route. Second, once we changed our lead test rules to include taking a lead fall, we decided that we are not going to ask our customers to do anything that we ourselves wouldn’t do. That being said, you will never see me take a lead fall on a vertical wall, which is why the lead test is on a steep part of the wall.

3, What would I have to do to fail? Back clipping, z-clipping, sloppy clipping, unbalanced clipping stance, getting your foot behind the rope especially when you’re above your last clip.

Following is a good example of how to fail your lead test. Watch as Tyler back clips the first draw and z-clips the third,

Here is a perfect example of how to flawlessly pass your lead test. Kathryn not only climbs with confidence, but she chooses a smart clip line, chooses a balanced stance for each clip and clips in what I like to think of as a climber’s strike zone – not too far over your head so that you are pulling a lot of slack which could lead to a dangerous fall if you blow the clip and not too far below your hips which would also create a longer fall than you might want.

An inability to clip the draws quickly is usually the accomplice in failing the lead test. Fumbling around trying to clip will not only make you more physically tired, but it will ruin your mental focus. A great way to practice your clipping is to hop on the auto belay on a leadable wall with a lead rope tied to your harness and mock lead routes. Another way to help you pass your lead test is to take our Learn to Lead class offered monthly at both gyms. It is a two day/three hour class that goes over both leading and lead belaying. The cost is $75 ($60 for members) and preregistration is required, check our calendar for the class schedule.

Assisted Climbing

The main goal of any climbing gym worker is to be able to assist any and every person that has the desire to live in our vertical world. Sometimes, that can come in the form of a stronger belay. For anyone with a physical impediment that keeps them from reaching the top, we can easily set up a 2:1 pulley system to give them an extra boost. We have used this system for people with muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy and paraplegia.

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One end of the rope is attached to the belay bar and feeds to a pulley at the bottom of the climb. It then loops back up to a second pulley that is also attached to the belay bar.

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The bottom of the system has the lower pulley that you attach to the climber (right) and a gri gri for the belayer (left).

If you know of anyone that would like to give climbing a try that could benefit from this system, give us a call and we can set this up for them. If you need someone to belay the climber for you, we can set that up as well with advance notice. Just call 303-254-4344 and ask for Amy.
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New RJ1 Ladies’ Night Commander-in-Chief

Hailing from the home of the first McDonald’s, Ronald Reagan and Superman, we bring you Chrissy, our new Ladies’ Night hostess with the mostess at RJ1. Please take a moment to get acquainted with her – you may never meet anyone with more enthusiasm.

Hey everybody! So you’re probably all wondering who I am and why I’m qualified to work and teach at an awesome gym like ROCK’n & JAM’n. Do I have what it takes? Will I be able to contribute? The short answer is HECK YES! Why? There are just too many reasons to mention, so I’ll try to focus on a few.

1First, I was born and raised for almost my entire life in one of the flattest, most featureless, and most corn-filled places in the entire US– you guessed it, the Land of Lincoln (and lobotomies)– The Great State of Illinois!! The entire state has less climbing gyms than the city of Boulder and for the majority of it’s citizens the closest outdoor experience they’ll ever have is a trip to the outdoor strip mall.

2Naturally, my passion for climbing and all things related THRIVED! I’m just kidding – until I got in to college I spent all of my days running and doing practically nothing else. When the climbing gym opened at my university all of my pent up desire to get involved in outdoor things was finally unleashed upon the world. I began to spend every weekend making the 3 hour drive to one of the only climbing crags in Illinois (Jackson Falls) and learned to get comfortable with ropes, carabiners, giant whippers, and sleeping on the ground (what the heck!!?).

 

 

3When I got a job working at our climbing gym at the university, I was so enthusiastic that I was awarded the “Employee of the Season” award, so don’t worry- you’re in good hands! Soon, the trips to Jackson Falls weren’t enough to satisfy my love for rock and I began making trips to more distant crags, sleeping as little as possible on the weekends in order to make that 6 hour trip to “the Red” or that 10 hour trip to “the New” and get back on time for my environmental chemistry class at 8 am Monday morning (A-!!!).

4Everyday I logged hours in the gym just waiting for the weekends when I got to get back on rock. When I graduated I was supposed to start attending medical school in Saint Louis, but instead I broke my parents hearts, packed up my Toyota Corolla and headed for greener pastures and the wild west where I have been told there are far more people who are familiar with the term “belay”. After a month long road trip to various climbing crags with my boyfriend, a route setter at ROCK’n & JAM’n, I settled in Colorado to start my awesome new outdoorsy and athletic life (Colorado don’t let me down!), because that’s how I roll.

5Now I’m just looking forward to exposure to people who climb far harder than me and I am looking to learn as much as possible and get STUPID strong. By the way, there weren’t many chick climbers in Illinois, so on that note, I am totally psyched to start leading “Ladies’ Night” to work with other women who are passionate about climbing.

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Chrissy promises big things for Ladies’ Night from bouldering to routes to training. Come and let her passion for climbing infect you while meeting other fantastic ladies to climb with as well. Starting Tuesday August 31st at RJ1 from 7:00-8:30pm.

Summer Camp Recap

boy-smilingEach summer we run 3 different types of Summer Camps for kids. The first 2 levels spend a week working on learning safe belaying techniques, knot tying, basic climbing footwork, and other climbing techniques. You would be amazed at the mileage these kids put in over 5 days. Our summer camps culminate with our indoor/outdoor camp.
little-boyThe indoor outdoor camp spends the first 2 days indoors learning about the differences between indoor and outdoor climbing. They talk about things like anchors, general trail and climbing etiquite, using a grigri, rock falls, and how to stay calm when you cannot figure out your sequence, etc. For the remainder of the week, the kids spend 5 hours outside baking in the sun but having a great time at areas such as Table Mountain and Castlewood Canyon. This year the kids bravely battled 90+ degree days with little complaint. They climbed with determination in spite of the oppressing conditions. Assuming they keep that “try hard” level up, we look forward to seeing some exciting things from these kids.
girl-belaying

Now that our summer camps are over, we will be starting our Youth Programs back up at the end of the month. Kids Can Belay Too (8-11 year olds) will kick off on Friday August 20th and our Youth School (12-18 year olds) festivities will commence the week after on Wednesday August 25th. For more information, call 303-climb99. Class sizes are limited, so call and reserve your space today.
piz-outdoorgroup-pic

Question: What’s a Moon Board when it’s at home?

Answer: It’s a training wall. We’ve put one up on the 3rd floor at RJ1.

moon-boardEssentially, a Moon Board is a set of holds that you buy from Moon Climbing and arrange on a wall in a very specific pattern in order to create boulder problems that Ben Moon considers to be a standard for the grade. They have several different arrangements that can be used with the same holds so you can change your Moon Board periodically and have fresh new boulder problems to work on. Be warned, the problems are a bit sandbagged by our standards, but don’t let that discourage you. A Moon Board gives you the opportunity to train and climb on the same exact problems that some of the world’s top climbers have trained on before you.

Here’s a link for more history on Ben Moon:

http://usa.moonclimbing.com/history-lesson-c-334_335.html

And one for further explanation on the board:

http://usa.moonclimbing.com/the-moon-board-c-334_336.html

Enjoy!

Christopher Palmer Pratt – Setter and Strength Trainer

While we are sad to see the Pizem’s go, we are equally excited that Chris Pratt (affectionately referred to as Chrispy) will be running our circuit training on Tuesday and Thursday nights. You may have met him in the boulder already, but in case you haven’t, he wrote a little something about himself for you:

I was born in De Smet, SD but have lived in the suburbs of Denver since I was two. After graduating from Northglenn High School in 2007 I worked a few jobs here and there when I got introduced to climbing. I was hooked instantly after a few visits to ROCK’n & JAM’n and a mind blowing experience in Eldorado canyon. I took to climbing very quickly. I climbed at ROCK’n & JAM’n for two hours a session three to five days a week working the problems till my bones were bruised. Flapper after flapper, move after move I worked my way into more difficult problems.

red-cliffAfter a about two years of building my love for climbing, R&J’s head route setter, Brendan Aiken, asked if I had an interest in setting for them. The flexibility of the schedule couldn’t have been better for school and the opportunity to learn more about the sport was more than enough. My first position at R&J was “hold refurbishing and conditioner”. In spring of 2009 I started setting routes full time. My skill in route setting slowly developed and, over time, I believe to have become a fairly adept setter. I was recently involved in a setting clinic lectured by Chris Danielson, a well venerated setter from Boulder, CO, and he has set for comps all over for regionals and nationals. Some of my biggest structural thoughts about climbing and setting really changed with what he had to show and say.

chispy-climbR&J always offers a very welcoming atmosphere and a strong community of climbers from all different levels of experience. Watching people grow and develop from the problems and routes we set has made quite a positive impact on my life – one that I hope to see continually grow. For the last few months, Rob and Jane Pizem have been running a training and conditioning program through the gym at a very fair price ($5 for 30 minutes). They will be relocating next month due to new job opportunities and will no longer be able to run the training classes. I have been working with Rob and Jane closely and will be taking over the circuit training from now on. This style of training is a terrific way to get stronger and climb harder. I’ve personally seen myself and others gain leaps and bounds in climbing through circuit training and I’m eager to help others realize their full potential in climbing.

dyno

Come check out Chrispy’s circuit training – 6:30 & 7:00pm at RJ1 on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Only $5 will get you in shape and climbing stronger. Check it out!